Tag: cognition

Like a shadow 

Depression is like the shadow that haunts us all secretly at some or the other period of time in our lives. It can become much like a vicious cycle if not attended to. There are a few things you could try 

Get yourself a change of place. Shift to a new room/home with more ventilation or a terrace or open balcony. Open air spaces are known to act like ventilator for the mind as much as the body by providing fresh air to breathe. The air we breathe is so important  yet so neglected. It’s really really important  to breathe fresh air. It’s cleansing for the body, as much as the mind.

Get yourself a small plant inside your room. Try placing it near your window. Tend to it every day and take care of by watering regularly. Green plants inside the home are known to be reflectors of positive energy.

Brighten your room. I won’t ask you to paint it afresh but bring in brighter bulbs into your room, an extra lamp would do great, too. Make sure you get ample sunlight inside your room during the day. Bright light would surely lessen the darkening thoughts in your head, too.

The best of all, get yourself a pet(if you can’t afford or manage an expensive pet , get fishes in a large bowl with lots of water for the fishes to swim around). Pets are said to elevate moods and #psychologists have found that homes with pets have lesser cases of depression-suffering members. If you can’t afford either, spend time or give food to the stray ones outside your home. Befriend them. That oughtta do the trick, too!

Snack on fruits. We often neglect the controllable factors to our health(physique and psyche). Fresh foods have high amounts of anti oxidants and fibre. They help in release of happy-hormones endorphins in your body giving you a full-feeling without a hint of sickness!

You could start working out/yoga. The world is celebrating the greatness of Yoga which benefits every single thought to every last cell in your being. I’ve personally benefitted a lot from yoga and that’s why I endorse it so much.

I won’t suggest you to push yourself too hard for anything but just remember this, medication and doctor…all on one side… You are the one and only bridge between them and a better and happier you! Take care.

zairakhan

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Life is to create 

Life is to create something, something tangible. You start with little or nothing perhaps, but then you plan and assemble and…build. which I think is the best thing that we all have motivation for..  But we can get worn down from  the continual burden of having to ultimately be responsible for achieving our dreams or not. And some would say they can get dangerously too caught up in running their lives than living them. But most of all we have to arrange for the most part of our lives and you can get to the new conclusion about life.  Some are left too much of themselves out in the quest and have become too one-dimensional. In the worst situations, there may be resentment and regret that much of endeavor was ultimately for naught. So we have to keep balance and go towards the end of the world than to get back into life’s  previous, past events,  by not  being sure to include and make and face new ones.

Zairakhan

Giving up? 

 

Shutting yourself away doesn’t really improve the situation. At best, you will remain in stasis, and not get worse, but not get better. The best strategy I found is to strengthen your physical self. Treat your body as a container for your mental and emotional/spiritual self. If the container is stronger, your mental side will be better able to function as well. So to start – eat clean (no junk food, protein at every meal, and lots of green veg), sleep a full 8 -10 hours/night, and exercise 30 minutes/day. If you can do this, you will be significantly less depressed. Then on the mental side – find a hobby that you can develop yourself more with. It doesn’t have to be anything in particular other than you have a sincere interest in it. Find a group class that you can join, and that will start you in the #social direction. If you become more confident socially, you might be able to find some self satisfaction . If not, then at least you will have more friends, and possibly they might know someone and of course that’s you

Start from now and here you are important don’t de evaluate and exhaust yourself … good luck.

zairakhan

Core beliefs 

Negativity affects your thoughts, how you see the world. Nothing is ever good, nothing will ever be good. The world is going to Hell in a hand basket. The thing is it doesn’t just affect you, it affects everyone around you. People stop paying attention, and start avoiding you, because negativity wears on everyone around you.

“Positive and negative emotions cannot occupy the mind at the same time. One or the other must dominate. It is your responsibility to make sure that positive emotions constitute the dominating influence of your mind.” — Napoleon Hill
If someone is diagnosed with any disorder, then same strategies more or less cannot be applied.. There is a great difference between clinical depression and depression.. your situational autopsy can get you into high gear fast if you are willing to examine and confront your own self related core beliefs. Which are sometimes totally irrational. Such beliefs can reside in our heads for so long that they may have become facts to us. Well, irrational beliefs, as we say are those that are actually inflexible, illogical and inconsistent with actual reality. As a psychologist I know that they tend to interfere with your psychological well being and get in the way of you pursuing meaningful goals. When your world feels like its falling apart, you are going to believe the bad ones more. So as a positive thinker you must challenge such myths rather than accept them as FACTS. you can  always check your positivity by checking self on reality check substances.. Like I don’t deserve a second chance to change my life for the better. No one would love me if I did all that only  I wanted. I am not quite confident about self to try something new with my life….

My point is positive thinkers promote productivity and creativity they support positive relationships. They have the ability for acceptance and tolerance. They know how to strengthen persistence and self discipline.. etc..

Patients have to use medicine and obviously cognitive behavioral therapies  and some strategies focusing on  on here and now, only then  they can someway get to the point of setting a forward looking goals. And with priorities straight way..

Zaira Khan

Psychological space.. 

For psychologists, distance is not just physical space. It is also psychological space, the degree to which you feel closely connected to someone else. You are describing psychological distance when you say that you feel “distant” from your spouse, “out of touch” with your kids’ lives, “worlds apart” from a neighbor’s politics, or “separated” from your employees. You don’t mean that you are physically distant from other people; you mean that you feel psychologically distant from them in some way. You’ve developed different beliefs than your spouse over time and have “grown apart,” your kids’ generation is so different from your own, or you work in a large corporation with more employees than you can name. These two features of social life—the magnitude of the gap between your own mind and others’ minds, and the motivation to reduce that gap—are critical for understanding when you engage your ability to think about other minds fully and when you do not.

Distance keeps your sixth sense disengaged for at least two reasons. First, your ability to understand the minds of others can be triggered by your physical senses. When you’re too far away in physical space, those triggers do not get pulled. Second, your ability to understand the minds of others is also engaged by your cognitive inferences. Too far away in psychological space—too different, too foreign, too other—and those triggers, again, do not get pulled. Understanding how these two triggers—your physical senses and your cognitive inferences—engage you with the mind of another person is essential for understanding the dehumanizing mistakes we can make when we remain disengaged.

Zaira Khan 

Psychological distance 

For psychologists, distance is not just physical space. It is also psychological space, the degree to which you feel closely connected to someone else. You are describing psychological distance when you say that you feel “distant” from your spouse, “out of touch” with your kids’ lives, “worlds apart” from a neighbor’s politics, or “separated” from your employees. You don’t mean that you are physically distant from other people; you mean that you feel psychologically distant from them in some way. You’ve developed different beliefs than your spouse over time and have “grown apart,” your kids’ generation is so different from your own, or you work in a large corporation with more employees than you can name. These two features of social life—the magnitude of the gap between your own mind and others’ minds, and the motivation to reduce that gap—are critical for understanding when you engage your ability to think about other minds fully and when you do not.

Distance keeps your sixth sense disengaged for at least two reasons. First, your ability to understand the minds of others can be triggered by your physical senses. When you’re too far away in physical space, those triggers do not get pulled. Second, your ability to understand the minds of others is also engaged by your cognitive inferences. Too far away in psychological space—too different, too foreign, too other—and those triggers, again, do not get pulled. Understanding how these two triggers—your physical senses and your cognitive inferences—engage you with the mind of another person is essential for understanding the dehumanizing mistakes we can make when we remain disengaged.

Zaira Khan