Tag: fact

Giving up? 

 

Shutting yourself away doesn’t really improve the situation. At best, you will remain in stasis, and not get worse, but not get better. The best strategy I found is to strengthen your physical self. Treat your body as a container for your mental and emotional/spiritual self. If the container is stronger, your mental side will be better able to function as well. So to start – eat clean (no junk food, protein at every meal, and lots of green veg), sleep a full 8 -10 hours/night, and exercise 30 minutes/day. If you can do this, you will be significantly less depressed. Then on the mental side – find a hobby that you can develop yourself more with. It doesn’t have to be anything in particular other than you have a sincere interest in it. Find a group class that you can join, and that will start you in the #social direction. If you become more confident socially, you might be able to find some self satisfaction . If not, then at least you will have more friends, and possibly they might know someone and of course that’s you

Start from now and here you are important don’t de evaluate and exhaust yourself … good luck.

zairakhan

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Unity 

Thank you unity for being there every time we fall.

Unity, you are the reason for all of us to remember each other and remain friends in togetherness.. 

We all want unity,

without any differences

for once so

there be no strings attacked

lets act 

like we stand firmly in our affiliation and

face our challenges 

and take the steps for our actions.

Lets be united

and go collectively. 

I need you,

We all need unity

for our independence

faithfully and peacefully. 

Zaira Khan

Psychological space 

For psychologists, distance is not just physical space. It is also psychological space, the degree to which you feel closely connected to someone else. You are describing psychological distance when you say that you feel “distant” from your spouse, “out of touch” with your kids’ lives, “worlds apart” from a neighbor’s politics, or “separated” from your employees. You don’t mean that you are physically distant from other people; you mean that you feel psychologically distant from them in some way. You’ve developed different beliefs than your spouse over time and have “grown apart,” your kids’ generation is so different from your own, or you work in a large corporation with more employees than you can name. These two features of social life—the magnitude of the gap between your own mind and others’ minds, and the motivation to reduce that gap—are critical for understanding when you engage your ability to think about other minds fully and when you do not.

Distance keeps your sixth sense disengaged for at least two reasons. First, your ability to understand the minds of others can be triggered by your physical senses. When you’re too far away in physical space, those triggers do not get pulled. Second, your ability to understand the minds of others is also engaged by your cognitive inferences. Too far away in psychological space—too different, too foreign, too other—and those triggers, again, do not get pulled. Understanding how these two triggers—your physical senses and your cognitive inferences—engage you with the mind of another person is essential for understanding the dehumanizing mistakes we can make when we remain disengaged.

Psychological space.. 

For psychologists, distance is not just physical space. It is also psychological space, the degree to which you feel closely connected to someone else. You are describing psychological distance when you say that you feel “distant” from your spouse, “out of touch” with your kids’ lives, “worlds apart” from a neighbor’s politics, or “separated” from your employees. You don’t mean that you are physically distant from other people; you mean that you feel psychologically distant from them in some way. You’ve developed different beliefs than your spouse over time and have “grown apart,” your kids’ generation is so different from your own, or you work in a large corporation with more employees than you can name. These two features of social life—the magnitude of the gap between your own mind and others’ minds, and the motivation to reduce that gap—are critical for understanding when you engage your ability to think about other minds fully and when you do not.

Distance keeps your sixth sense disengaged for at least two reasons. First, your ability to understand the minds of others can be triggered by your physical senses. When you’re too far away in physical space, those triggers do not get pulled. Second, your ability to understand the minds of others is also engaged by your cognitive inferences. Too far away in psychological space—too different, too foreign, too other—and those triggers, again, do not get pulled. Understanding how these two triggers—your physical senses and your cognitive inferences—engage you with the mind of another person is essential for understanding the dehumanizing mistakes we can make when we remain disengaged.

Zaira Khan 

Just be smart 

Hmmmm… Don’t hide, just be smart 😊

You know there are times where we have to hold back. Like maybe the other person is in a relationship and that’s when you have to be careful because either way you might lose.. Sayings  that are true for some people are not always true for others. and as far is what makes us fall deeper well that also varies from person to person. being a hopeless romantic by nature, I believe that being able to be yourself around the person is key. Also, them being able to be themselves around you is important.

This is one of those statements that on the surface sounds deep, but is actually superficial. It’s like, “if you just keep looking, you’ll find the thing you’re looking for in the last place you look.” Well, of course! Your feelings tend to grow the longer you hide them because as long as you’re hiding them you’re still nursing feelings and nursed feelings tend to grow.

Zaira Khan