Tag: faith

No end to this cruelty

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Today the world is facing great threats of terrorism. Thousands of innocent people have been killed and still there seems to be no end to this cruelty. Some blame Islam as a religion of grave terror and bloodshed. But, in reality, there is no connection between Islam and terrorism at all; Islam is as closely related to terrorism as light is to darkness or life is to death or peace is to war. Islam very strongly condemns terrorism and encourages establishing peace and order in the land.
However, one cannot deny that on many occasions some Muslims are found involved in terrorist activities either individually, on behalf of a group or on behalf of a country with a predominately Muslim population.
But let it be very clear that we do not justify terrorism of any kind whatsoever, whatever the colour, religion, sentiment or objective the terrorist may claim to represent. Islam does not approve of disorder in any form. Islam does far from teach terrorism. It teaches rule of law, obedience to the authorities and does not let anyone take the law into his own hands. The Holy Quran states:
“O ye who believe! Obey Allah, and obey His Messenger and those who are in authority over you.’ (Ch.4: V.60)
The Holy Quran states that “those who create disorder in the earth, they are the real losers”; “and commit not iniquity in the earth, creating disorder”; “and Allah loves not disorder”. Such words and phrases are found in the Holy Quran repeatedly.
After this clear teaching such terrorist actions of some Muslim individuals or groups have no cover or justification at all, and they must be condemned widely. And those who are involved must be brought in front of justice.
As far as Islam is concerned, it categorically rejects and condemns every form of terrorism. It does not provide any cover or justification for any act of violence, be it committed by an individual, a group or a government.
The Muslim Community, which is a peace loving and law abiding community, strongly condemns all acts of terrorism anywhere in the world.We join in spreading a message of peace, love, harmony, tolerance and brotherhood.
We reject and condemn all acts and forms of violence and terrorism unreservedly and totally, because it is our deeply rooted belief that not only Islam but also no true religion, whatever its name, can sanction violence and the bloodshed of innocent men, women and children in the name of God. God is love, God is peace!
Love can never beget hatred, and peace can never lead to war.
Zairakhan
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Psychological space 

For psychologists, distance is not just physical space. It is also psychological space, the degree to which you feel closely connected to someone else. You are describing psychological distance when you say that you feel “distant” from your spouse, “out of touch” with your kids’ lives, “worlds apart” from a neighbor’s politics, or “separated” from your employees. You don’t mean that you are physically distant from other people; you mean that you feel psychologically distant from them in some way. You’ve developed different beliefs than your spouse over time and have “grown apart,” your kids’ generation is so different from your own, or you work in a large corporation with more employees than you can name. These two features of social life—the magnitude of the gap between your own mind and others’ minds, and the motivation to reduce that gap—are critical for understanding when you engage your ability to think about other minds fully and when you do not.

Distance keeps your sixth sense disengaged for at least two reasons. First, your ability to understand the minds of others can be triggered by your physical senses. When you’re too far away in physical space, those triggers do not get pulled. Second, your ability to understand the minds of others is also engaged by your cognitive inferences. Too far away in psychological space—too different, too foreign, too other—and those triggers, again, do not get pulled. Understanding how these two triggers—your physical senses and your cognitive inferences—engage you with the mind of another person is essential for understanding the dehumanizing mistakes we can make when we remain disengaged.